Feng Shui Blog

Prime Minister Theresa May: finished by 2022

Prime Minister Theresa May: finished by 2022

No sooner did I release my post on how the feng shui success factor indicates that Donald Trump is likely to be an eight-year president, than people as asking me “Well, what about Theresa May?” So here it is folks:

Indication by feng shui success factor calculation

Since the last UK general election, there seems to be non-stop speculation within the media as to how long Theresa May might remain in office as Prime Minister. While the Prime Minister herself talks about leading the country into the next general election, there are some who are suggesting that a new leader would be a better option at that time.
The feng shui success factor calculation indicates that Theresa May is likely to serve between three and six years in office.
Curiously enough, this suggests that Mrs. May’s grip on power will be lost at some time between the completion of the Brexit process and the next general election, which is what the political commentators currently seem to be suggesting.

A brief overview of the success factor

In short, my success factor research project looked at US Presidents and UK Prime Ministers. I found that with a new calculation using the key feng shui readings of the Whitehouse (or 10 Downing Street), together with the date of birth of the incumbent concerned, it seemed possible to show how long a President or Prime Minister would be in office.

Actual time in office

The first chart here shows how long each of the recent UK Prime Ministers actually spent in office.

UK Prime Ministers actual time in office

Calculated time in office

This chart shows the time in office that Mike’s unitque feng shui success factor calculation indicates.

UK Prime Ministers indicated time in office

How Thersa May Trump fits into the feng shui success factor indicator

This last graph shows how the calculated success factor of Thersa May fits into the pattern with past Prime Ministers. Mrs. May has a very similar calculated success factor to that of John Major and David Cameron which suggests a six year term. However, Jim Callaghan also showed a similar calculated success factor and his reign as PM was relatively short at just over three years.

It is likely therefore that Thersa May will no longer hold the office of PM after the next general election in 2022.

Theresa May calculated success factor
President Donald Trump: here for the long haul!

President Donald Trump: here for the long haul!

Result of feng shui success factor calculation

Despite all the difficulties that seems to have beset the Trump administration in its early days, the feng shui success factor calculation suggests that President Trump will remain in office for the maximum 8-year term.

 A brief overview

In short, my success factor research project looked at US Presidents and UK Prime Ministers. I found that with a new calculation using the key feng shui readings of the Whitehouse (or 10 Downing Street), together with the date of birth of the incumbent concerned, it seemed possible to show how long a President or Prime Minister would be in office.

Actual time in office

The first chart here shows how long each of the recent US Presidents actually spent in office.

US President actual time in office

Calculated time in office

This chart shows the time in office that the calculation predicts – if there were no time limitation. All those to the right of the red line were limited in their time of service to the maximum 8 years.

US presidents calculated time in office

How President Trump fits into the feng shui success factor calculations

The big question of course, is how long with President Trump stay in office?

In this modified chart, the calculated time in office of Donald Trump is indicated in green. He is clearly well within the scope of a two term president.

Conclusion: the indication given by this calculation, suggests that President Trump will be in office for the full 8 years.

US presidents plus Trump: calculated time in office
Glass tower blocks, public spaces and feng shui

Glass tower blocks, public spaces and feng shui

Glass towers are killing off public spaces

The seemingly unstoppable march of glass monoliths across our environment is killing off public space. They are turning our cities are turning into halls of mirrors. They create a cold and disquieting sensation, inducing feelings of anxiety or worry. People tend to be pushed away from them rather than be drawn in. The comfort and security of the more traditional squares and open spaces that naturally occur between buildings are no longer being created between the rows of newly erected towers. The more modern, glass lined public spaces that result from modern development are generally seen by the passing population as somewhere to walk or indeed rush through, rather than somewhere that they might sit, relax, and enjoy the sensation of being in the space.

These were, in essence, some of the thoughts put forward by Justin Davidson in his recent TED talk, and I have to say his comments echo my own thoughts very closely.

No surprises to then: this is entirely in keeping with feng shui theory and expectation.

It may well be surprising to most people, that the changes in the usage and function of those spaces sprouting the architectural weeds of modern high-rise buildings, are entirely in keeping with feng shui theory. These changes could easily have been anticipated had anyone chosen to apply a wider scale feng shui perspective.

The build-up of water-chi holds the key

One aspect of the explanation lies in the use of glass and particularly mirrored glass. In the feng shui five-element system, glass belongs loosely to the water-chi element. One of the energetic qualities of water-chi is that of chaos, and the chaotic nature appears in the reflections seen in mirrored or glass covered buildings: a hundred different observers see a hundred different versions of the same place. We are naturally all familiar with this feature of the way mirrors work.

Water-chi is also associated with darkness and the middle of the night, a time that is typically chilly or cold. For most of us, to walk down a totally dark road in the middle of the night would undoubtedly raise fears and anxieties for our safety.

The water-chi associated with glass, therefore brings with it a feeling of chaos rather than security, cold rather than warmth, anxiety rather than comfort. The over use of glass will certainly increase these kinds of feelings in the people using the space: this is simple feng shui in action.

Water-chi also works to reduce “coming together” or meeting energies

According to the five-element system, water-chi also works to lessen or drain metal-chi, where the energetic quality of metal-chi is coming together, gathering or meeting. Too many glass buildings will surely sure help to exaggerate the behaviour of “not sitting and chatting”. Again, this is a very basic influence that our environment can have on us as described by feng shui systems that have been around for some thousands of years. It really should come as no surprise that the ideas expressed by these ancient systems are borne out in real life today.

Tower blocks support progression and productivity

During his talk, Justin also mentions that new tower blocks are built to support business and its objectives rather than to create popular and well used public space. I sense here he also hits the nail on the head, and predictably through feng shui observation, tower blocks are indeed supportive of productivity and progress. If creating comfortable public space is anywhere on the agenda of the tower block builders, particularly in the business areas of town, then they are spectacularly failing in their objective. A good “people hugging” space has its own feng shui requirements, which are unlikely to be found accidentally in a jungle of towers, glass or otherwise.

You are welcome to ask questions about this article if you wish